Legal Dictionary

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Grand Theft

In general, grand theft is the taking of money, property or labor of another, whose value exceeds $950 and is prosecuted under California Penal Code Sections 487 and 484.

There are some circumstances however, where the value of the item(s) taken can be less than $950 and still be considered grand theft. If the items taken were: domestic fowl, avocados, olives, citrus, nuts, artichokes or other enumerated fruits and vegetables the items need only value over $250 to be considered grand theft. Theft of fish, shellfish, mollusks, crustaceans, kelp, algae or other aquatic products from a commercial or research facility also need only be valued at over $250 to be considered grand theft. The taking of any automobile, firearm, horse, mare, gelding, bovine animal, caprine animal, mule, jack, jenny, sheep, lamb, hog, sow, boar, gilt barrow or pig will be considered grand theft regardless of its value.

Theft convictions are serious and should be handled by an experienced criminal defense attorney with a successful track record. Employers today are conducting extensive background checks on prospective employees and consider a theft conviction to be a serious dishonest act and a character flaw justifying a denial of employment.